Endangered RHINO Facts and Resources

There are five species of Rhino.  White Rhino (near threatened), Black Rhino (critically endangered), Sumatran Rhino (critically endangered), Javan Rhino (critically endangered), and Greater One-horned Rhino (vulnerable).  White and Black Rhinos have no true natural predators.  Man is the primary reason for their drastic decline.  Loss of habitat does not help, but the greatest threat is poaching.  Rhinos are poached for their horn primarily because many people, mostly in Asian countries, believe that Rhino horn is magic.  Truth is, they would save a lot of money and lives if they would simply eat, snort, smoke, and digest their own fingernails. Rhino horn is made of the exact same material that's in your fingernails. It is only magical when safely viewed on a Rhino in the WILD.


Poaching is a world-wide crisis that must be addressed through aggressive action and increased education before we lose these beautiful creatures forever.  Below you will find links about the Rhino as well as many links about the brutal reality of poaching.  We can tell you from first-hand experience that this tragedy is very real, extremely complicated, and that your help in raising awareness is not just incredibly important to Rhinos and those on the front lines, but to us all.

 

Helpful links can be found at the bottom of this page.

NEW 7/10/2015 Alec's recent school paper detailing the pros and cons of legalizing rhino horn:

One animal that I am very passionate about is the rhino. Now, as you probably know, the rhino is endangered due to excessive poaching. There have been all sorts of ideas that people have come up with as a possible solution, but one of the most controversial ones is to just legalise the trade of rhino horn. There are many pros and cons to this action and I am now going to present a view from both sides that can be taken on this topic.

 

The positive outlook on legalizing the trade of rhino horn is that it would initially flood the market. Because there are large anti-rhino poaching organizations that take rhino horns from poachers, there is a large stock. The organizations get the horns when poachers are caught on site, if someone is caught with one in their home, or a lot of the time the poachers are caught with multiple horns trying to be smuggled through airports. There are also horns that are humanely filed down or cut off a live rhino in order to reduce the risk of that horn being taken. These horns are then locked away, where they collect dust. With all these horns that are locked away, they could surely flood the market, thus lowering demand. Because the consumers would be buying from a legal trade, the black market would become obsolete. When the illegal trade becomes obsolete, no one funds poachers. When no one funds poachers, those who protect rhinos don’t have to risk their lives to fight against the poachers. The stored horns would otherwise have no use and would just be tucked away for all eternity. Plus, with all of this money from the sold rhino horns, organizations would be able to put the money back into bringing the populations back up. While all of this trade is occurring, the rhino is safe and has time to repopulate again. If we get really lucky, in the time that everyone has access to the horns, it will become clear to all consumers that the rhino horn serves no real medicinal purpose. 

 

Now, for the view of those against the legalization of rhino horn trade.  First off, it would be very two-faced to let everyone consume rhino horn after spending years fighting against the idea. Ok, let’s say that it is released into the market, it’s now only a matter of time before the horn stock runs dry and poachers are out killing rhino again. By introducing something as valuable as rhino horn into an open market, consumers will get used to having this product at their fingertips. So once the legal market can no longer supply, the black market is back in business.

 

Also, while the legal market is selling rhino horn, who’s to say that poachers won’t be out killing rhino regardless? Once the poacher leaves the park, there is nothing wrong with having a horn in your possession. The poacher can then sell the horn at a discounted price on the black market and in the end some money is made. This discount technique is possible since the legal market has to sell them at a fairly high price in order for them to not fly off the shelves in a matter of days. The legal market has to be strategic with their pricing because if the price is too high, other sources of rhino horn will be used instead. If the pricing is too low, then the cartels (the bad guys) will just buy out the shops, wait for the legal market to run dry and then sell them illegally at a very high price. Once their supply runs out, the cartels will then be back to hiring poachers to continue the flow of money. There are all sorts of other negative scenarios for this action as well and once this is done, there is no reversing it.

 

Unfortunately, there is really no perfect solution for a problem like this. Only in a perfect world can we stop all evil.   -Alec J. Fischer
     

Resources about Rhinos
Alec in WILDerland - South Africa Special

http://www.rhinos.org/...

http://www.savetherhino.org/...

http://www.rhinos.org/...

http://wwf.panda.org/...

http://www.defenders.org/...

http://www.defenders.org/...

http://scribol.com/environment/...

 

Resources about Poaching
Alec in WILDerland - South Africa Special
http://www.savetherhino.org/...

http://youth4africanwildlife.com/...

http://www.africa-wildlife-detective.com/...

http://wwf.panda.org/...
 

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